MENTAL HEALTH, DRUGS & ALCOHOL

#RU2Drunk Pilot

#RU2Drunk Pilot

The pilot scheme, designed to target the culture of excessive pre-drinking and cut alcohol-related crime, saw breathalysers distributed to 29 pubs, clubs and bars across Weymouth.

The project was jointly funded by the OPCC and Weymouth BID. Throughout, Dorset Police worked closely with senior lecturers at the University of Exeter, who developed the analysis and carried out the evaluation of the project.

Owners set an alcohol limit for their premise and door staff were able to use readings that exceeded this limit as an additional tool, supporting their own judgement when refusing entry.

In December, typically one of the busiest times in the night time economy of Weymouth, there was a 15% reduction in violent crime compared to 2015 figures. However, with full and consistent support from owners of pubs and clubs involved, it is hoped that these early successes can be improved upon further.

Results so far

Mental Health Provisions

Mental Health Provisions

As APCC Portfolio Lead for Mental Health and Custody Issues, the Commissioner, backed by over two thirds of PCCs nationally, wrote to Ministers to formally express reservations with regards to changes to the Mental Health Act 1983.

The Commissioner challenged the view that police stations or cells can continue to be used as places of safety for people in mental health crisis, in exceptional circumstances.

While the Commissioner welcomes the changes with respect of persons under 18 years of age, he continues to lobby Government to extend that same protection to all persons.

Read the full letter

Awareness Week Campaign

Awareness Week Campaign

This Mental Health Awareness Week, which ran from Monday 8 to Sunday 14 May 2017, my Office organised a campaign with the support of Dorset Police, Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service, South West Ambulance Service Trust and Dorset Healthcare University NHS Foundation Trust to take that pledge one step further.

This Mental Health Awareness Week, which ran from Monday 8 to Sunday 14 May 2017, my Office organised a campaign with the support of Dorset Police, Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service, South West Ambulance Service Trust and Dorset Healthcare University NHS Foundation Trust to take that pledge one step further.

One in four people in the UK experience a mental health problem in any given year. Colleagues in the blue light community are even more likely to suffer with mental ill health than those in other professions, and are less likely to seek help.

Having been in policing for over 30 years, the Commissioner has personal experience of the risks facing emergency service personnel when it comes to maintaining good mental health.

The OPCC issued case studies from frontline police officers and staff, fire officers , paramedics and nurses on Dorset PCC social media channels. Blue light colleagues shared examples of personal techniques used to manage stress, anxiety and depression. The positive campaign focused on providing emergency service workers with practical advice and new techniques to try to stay on top of mental health.

Check out @PCCDorset social media channels and search the hashtags #ITookHome and #ItsGoodToTalk to find out more about the campaign.

Read the full blog

Close

Sign up for news

Fill in your name and email address to receive our quarterly newsletter direct to your inbox. We share information on what we’re working on, our public engagement activities as well as how we’re investing in Policing in Dorset.

Confirmation Required