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Survey seeks residents’ experiences of anti social behaviour

Dorset’s Police and Crime Commissioner has launched a survey asking residents about their experiences of anti social behaviour.

The survey will ask residents whether they have been victims of anti social behaviour, how much of a problem they think it is in their area and whether they believe it’s got worse or better in recent years.

Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill, who is launching the survey today, hopes to gain a broader understanding of the issue across Dorset and how it affects residents’ lives.

To complete the survey go here.

He said: “Anti social behaviour can make people’s day to day lives a misery and can have a devastating impact on individuals and communities.

“I’ve heard many stories about people’s lives being ruined by incidents of nuisance and disorder, so I’m launching the survey to understand the problem in more detail.”

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The survey will also look into what types of anti social behaviour residents think Dorset Police should prioritise, as well as whether people who have experienced problems have reported them to the police and other agencies.

The police take responsibility for certain kinds of anti social behaviour – such as threatening or drunken behaviour and buying drugs on the street – with organisations such as local authorities and housing associations dealing with a range of other incidents, such as barking dogs and noisy neighbours.

The survey will also look into people’s understanding of which organisations they should contact when reporting different types of anti social behaviour.

Findings will be used to plan future strategies helping the police work with organisations to tackle the problem as well as to brief the county’s next Police and Crime Commissioner after forthcoming elections.

Mr Underhill previously announced he would not stand in the elections, which were originally supposed to take place in May but were postponed until May 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

He said: “We’re trying to get responses from as wide a range of people as possible – including people who have been victims of anti social behaviour as well as those who may have been perpetrators.

“It’s also important that we get views of younger people, as they are often affected by many of these problems."

Go here for a guide to how to report different kinds of anti social behaviour and which organisations are responsible.

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